Más tarde con la aparición de Warcraft, el juego de rol y World of Warcraft (ambos de 2003), la tradición popular del mundo fantástico que argumenta los juegos y literatura de Warcraft se hizo considerablemente compleja, retomó para ello a varias criaturas fantásticas o razas de Dungeons & Dragons,9​ The Lord of the Rings y la mitología tradicional de varias partes del mundo, como lo tiende a hacer gran parte de la literatura fantástica contemporánea. También ha incorporado distintos lenguajes y vocaciones u oficios que determinan los modos de vida de los aventureros, así como la distinción entre las razas mortales y los inmortales.10​

In late 2007, a series of television commercials for the game began airing featuring pop culture celebrities such as Mr. T, William Shatner, and Verne Troyer discussing the virtues of the character classes they play in the game.[153] A Spanish commercial featuring Guillermo Toledo, and a French commercial featuring Jean-Claude Van Damme, were also televised.[154] Two more were shown in November 2008, featuring Ozzy Osbourne and Steve Van Zandt.[155] Another commercial in the series, which began airing in November 2011, featured Chuck Norris and played on the Internet phenomenon of "Chuck Norris facts".[156]
The practice of buying or selling gold in World of Warcraft has generated significant controversy.[143] On February 21, 2008, Blizzard released a statement concerning the consequences of buying gold. Blizzard reported that an "alarmingly high" proportion of all gold bought originates from "hacked" accounts. The article also stated that customers who had paid for character leveling services had found their accounts compromised months later, with all items stripped and sold for virtual gold. The article noted that leveling service companies often used "disruptive hacks ... which can cause realm performance and stability issues".[144] In April 2015, introduced a means to sell in-game gold for real money. A player may spend $20 on a one-month "game time token" that can be sold for in-game gold on the auction house.[36]
Blizzard makes use of a system known as Warden on the Windows version of the game to detect third-party programs, such as botting software, allowing World of Warcraft to be played unattended. There has been some controversy as to the legality of Warden. Warden uses techniques similar to anti-virus software to analyze other running software on the players' PCs, as well as the file system. However, unlike most anti-virus software, it sends a portion of this information back to Blizzard, which caused privacy advocates to accuse it of being spyware.[122] One example of the information Warden collects is the title of every window open on the system while WoW is running.[123] On the other hand, many gamers responded positively to the development, stating that they supported the technology if it resulted in fewer cases of cheating. Blizzard's use of Warden was stated in the Terms of Agreement (TOA).[124]
World of Warcraft (abreviado como WoW, literalmente en español Mundo de Warcraft) es un videojuego de rol multijugador masivo en línea desarrollado por Blizzard Entertainment. Es el cuarto juego lanzado establecido en el universo fantástico de Warcraft, el cual fue introducido por primera vez por Warcraft: Orcs & Humans en 1994.4​ World of Warcraft transcurre dentro del mundo de Azeroth, cuatro años después de los sucesos finales de la anterior entrega de Warcraft, Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne.5​ Blizzard Entertainment anunció World of Warcraft el 2 de septiembre de 2001.6​
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