08 nov La Demo es una chapuza, broma de mal gusto - Phasing - Ventana de LFR - Puntos de experiencia bufados - El warrior en lvl 15 pega muchísmo - Regeneración alta de vida/mana - Daño infligido / recibido - En la versión en español, al mago lo llaman CHAMAN ... Blizzard, esto no es una demo de Classic. Parece un refrito de varias expansiones. ES UNA BASURA. No consigo encontrar ninguna explicación para TAMAÑA CHAPUZA. No es digno de una empresa como vosotros. No he puesto ni un euro en el WoW desde WotLK, y seguiré sin hacerlo si seguís así.Nain81 08 nov

Much of World of Warcraft play involves the completion of quests. These quests are usually available from NPCs.[19] Quests usually reward the player with some combination of experience points, items, and in-game money. Quests allow characters to gain access to new skills and abilities, as well as the ability to explore new areas.[20] It is through quests that much of the game's story is told, both through the quest's text and through scripted NPC actions.[21] Quests are linked by a common theme, with each consecutive quest triggered by the completion of the previous, forming a quest chain. Quests commonly involve killing a number of creatures, gathering a certain number of resources, finding a difficult to locate object, speaking to various NPCs, visiting specific locations, interacting with objects in the world, or delivering an item from one place to another to acquire experience and treasures.


In the United States, Canada, and Europe, Blizzard distributes World of Warcraft via retail software packages.[50] The software package includes 30 days of gameplay for no additional cost. To continue playing after the initial 30 days, additional play time must be purchased using a credit card or prepaid game card. The minimum gameplay duration that a player can purchase is 30 days using a credit card, or 60 using a prepaid game card. A player also has the option of purchasing three or six months of gameplay at once for a 6–15% discount.[51] In Australia, the United States, and many European countries, video game stores commonly stock the trial version of World of Warcraft in DVD form, which includes the game and 20 levels[52] of gameplay, after which the player would have to upgrade to a retail account by supplying a valid credit card, or purchasing a game card as well as a retail copy of the game.

Para aprender una profesión, hay que acudir a un instructor de la misma en las ciudades y algunos poblados. Todas las profesiones tienen distintos niveles, y cada nivel permite mejorar la habilidad hasta un número máximo de puntos, que se suben practicando en la profesión, ya sea recogiendo o fabricando algo. La cantidad de puntos permitirá recoger materiales más difíciles, así como aprender a fabricar objetos más poderosos. Todas las profesiones pueden aprenderse desde nivel 5, salvo la profesión secundaria arqueología, que requiere que el jugador sea nivel 20.24​

World of Warcraft has inspired two board games: World of Warcraft: The Board Game (including Shadow of War and The Burning Crusade expansions)[157] and World of Warcraft: The Adventure Game,[158][159] produced by Fantasy Flight Games. There is also a trading card game,[160] and a collectible miniatures game[161] on the market, both formerly produced by Upper Deck Entertainment, now produced by Cryptozoic Entertainment. Cryptozoic released an "Archives" set which contains foil reproductions of older cards produced by Upper Deck. In August 2012, Megabloks launched a licensed line of World of Warcraft 'building block' toys based on the game scenes, scenarios and characters.[162] In March 2014, Hearthstone: Heroes of Warcraft was released, which is a free-to-play digital card game based on the Warcraft universe, using classes similar to World of Warcraft.[163]
While a character can be played on its own, players can group with others to tackle more challenging content. Most end-game challenges are designed in a way that they can only be overcome while in a group. In this way, character classes are used in specific roles within a group.[19][22] World of Warcraft uses a "rested bonus" system, increasing the rate that a character can gain experience points after the player has spent time away from the game.[15] When a character dies, it becomes a ghost—or wisp for Night Elf characters—at a nearby graveyard.[20] Characters can be resurrected by other characters that have the ability or can self-resurrect by moving from the graveyard to the place where they died. If a character is past level ten and they resurrect at a graveyard, the items equipped by the character degrade, requiring in-game money and a specialist NPC to repair them. Items that have degraded heavily become unusable until they are repaired. If the location of the character's body is unreachable, they can use a special "spirit healer" NPC to resurrect at the graveyard. When the spirit healer revives a character, items equipped by the character at that time are further degraded, and the character is significantly weakened by what is in-game called "resurrection sickness" for up to ten minutes, depending on the character's level. This "resurrection sickness" does not occur and item degradation is less severe if the character revives by locating its body, or is resurrected by another player through spells or special items.[23][24]
When new content is added to the game, official system requirements may change. In version 1.12.0 the requirements for Windows were increased from requiring 256 MB to 512 MB of RAM. Official Windows 98 technical support was dropped, but the game continued to run there until version 2.2.3.[63] Before Mists of Pandaria, World of Warcraft will officially drop support for Windows 2000.[64]
In China, because a large number of players do not own the computer on which they play games (e.g. if they play in Internet cafés), the CD keys required to create an account can be purchased independently of the software package. To play the game, players must also purchase prepaid game cards that can be played for 66 hours and 40 minutes.[55] A monthly fee model is not available to players of this region. The Chinese government and NetEase, the licensee for World of Warcraft in China, have imposed a modification on Chinese versions of the game which places flesh on bare-boned skeletons and transforms dead character corpses into tidy graves. These changes were imposed by the Chinese government in an attempt to "promote a healthy and harmonious online game environment" in World of Warcraft.[56][57] The Chinese government delayed the release of the Wrath of the Lich King expansion, due to what it deemed objectionable content.[58] NetEase took over licensing of World of Warcraft from The9 in June 2009 following the expiration of The9's contract,[59] and were able to secure a launch for Wrath of the Lich King on August 31, 2010, nearly two years after its Western release.
Existen un total de trece razas jugables16​ divididas en dos facciones, la Alianza y la Horda, siendo la decimotercera raza (Pandaren) compartida por ambos bandos. Pertenecen a la Alianza: humanos, gnomos, enanos, elfos de la noche, draenéi, huarguens y pandarens; y pertenecen a la Horda: orcos, no-muertos renegados, troles, taurens, elfos de sangre, goblins y pandarens. En la mayoría de las zonas, la Alianza y la Horda están en guerra una con la otra, aunque existen zonas neutrales como la ciudad flotante de Dalaran o la Ciudadela de Shattrath, estas zonas son conocidas como santuarios.
×